To Your Health: Blood tests significantly underestimated lead levels, FDA and CDC warn

America’s love-hate relationship with the fidget spinner: Is technology to blame for our restlessness?; Nearly 700 vacancies at CDC because of Trump administration’s hiring freeze; ‘An embarrassment’: U.S. health care far from the top in global study; Women with advanced breast cancer are surviving longer, study says; ‘Internet abortions’ may be safe option where procedure is restricted, study suggests; A teen chugged a latte, a Mountain Dew and an energy drink. The caffeine binge led to his death.; Trump expansion of abortion ‘gag rule’ will restrict $8.8 billion in U.S. aid; John Oliver on kidney dialysis, Taco Bell and death;
 
To Your Health
 
 
America’s love-hate relationship with the fidget spinner: Is technology to blame for our restlessness?
In past centuries, people worked with their hands all day on building tools and farming. Could fidgets be a way for people now to channel that energy while focusing their minds on cognitive tasks?
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Nearly 700 vacancies at CDC because of Trump administration’s hiring freeze
Health and Human Services is one of several federal agencies to maintain the freeze on their own.
 
‘An embarrassment’: U.S. health care far from the top in global study
The United States scores well in diseases preventable by vaccines, but it gets almost failing grades for nine other conditions that can lead to death.
 
Women with advanced breast cancer are surviving longer, study says
Increasing survival rates of women with metastatic disease reflect improved treatments, researchers found.
 
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Blood tests significantly underestimated lead levels, FDA and CDC warn
The lead tests in question drew blood from veins, rather than the more common heel- and finger-prick technique. The problem may go back to 2014.
 
‘Internet abortions’ may be safe option where procedure is restricted, study suggests
The study involved about 1,000 women in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
 
A teen chugged a latte, a Mountain Dew and an energy drink. The caffeine binge led to his death.
Davis Cripe’s sudden collapse in class was a mystery. Then friends told investigators what he had for lunch.
 
Trump expansion of abortion ‘gag rule’ will restrict $8.8 billion in U.S. aid
Critics worry that the new policy, which the Trump administration calls Protecting Life in Global Health Assistance, will have the opposite effect by resulting in the closure of critical health facilities.
 
John Oliver on kidney dialysis, Taco Bell and death
For-profit kidney dialysis clinics should not be run “like a Taco Bell,” the “Last Week Tonight” host said — before apologizing to Taco Bell.
 
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