Thursday’s Headlines: Special counsel appointed to oversee inquiry of Russia, Trump

Q&A: What exactly is a ‘special counsel,’ and how will his investigation work?; Some Republicans nervously begin stepping away from the president; Joe Lieberman, three others to meet with Trump about FBI director job; House Majority Leader McCarthy told colleagues in 2016: ‘I think Putin pays’ Trump; A tough job in Washington right now: Working for Trump; President Trump is turning to the strategies from his business career. They may not be helping.;
 
Democracy Dies in Darkness
 
 
Today's Headlines
The morning’s most important stories, selected by Post editors
 
 
Top Stories
Special counsel appointed to oversee inquiry of Russia, Trump
Robert S. Mueller III, a former prosecutor who served as the FBI director from 2001 to 2013, has agreed to serve in the role, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein said. The move marks a concession by the Trump administration to Democratic demands for the investigation to be run independently of the Justice Department.
Q&A: What exactly is a ‘special counsel,’ and how will his investigation work?
Robert Mueller will still answer to Rod Rosenstein and rely on the Justice Department for his budget.
 
Some Republicans nervously begin stepping away from the president
Within the GOP this week, what had been a fairly solid wall of support has suddenly developed cracks. But where some see the start of a snowballing opposition, others caution that a momentary crisis does not necessarily imply collapse.
 
Joe Lieberman, three others to meet with Trump about FBI director job
The former senator is on a new short list of candidates that also includes former Oklahoma governor Frank Keating and the current acting director.
 
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EXCLUSIVE
House Majority Leader McCarthy told colleagues in 2016: ‘I think Putin pays’ Trump
Kevin McCarthy made the politically explosive assertion in a private conversation on Capitol Hill in June 2016 with his fellow GOP leaders. House Speaker Paul D. Ryan interjected and stopped the conversation from exploring McCarthy’s assertion, saying: “No leaks. … This is how we know we’re a real family here.”
 
A tough job in Washington right now: Working for Trump
As the president has grown increasingly angry with his staff, his aides have their own complaints about him. Some White House staffers have turned to impeachment gallows humor. Others have started reaching out to consultants, shopping their résumés.
 
President Trump is turning to the strategies from his business career. They may not be helping.
The tactics that Trump believed served him so well in business — insisting on bare-bones briefings, threatening opponents with litigation and relying on a small but fiercely loyal cadre of advisers — may be adding to his self-inflicted wounds.
 
 
Opinions
 
Rod Rosenstein saves the Republican Party from itself
 
Trump has caused a catastrophe. Let’s end it quickly.
 
With Mueller as the special prosecutor, the White House has every reason to panic
 
Trump may have broken one D.C. Commandment too many
 
An old ‘disease’ that could help lawmakers understand today’s health-care debate
 
A special counsel is essential. But Congress isn’t off the hook.
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More News
 
Trump’s first full education budget: Deep cuts to public school programs in pursuit of school choice
Documents obtained by The Post show how the president wants to cut $10.6 billion from federal education initiatives and expand charter schools and vouchers for private and religious schools.
‘They’ve forgotten who got them here’: Conservative media upset with Trump
They say they’ve become second-class citizens in their access and connections to the administration. Several are upset that major interviews and big scoops have gone to mainstream news outlets.
How a Trump order on abortion could hurt the fight against AIDS in Africa
Many HIV/AIDS organizations funded by the United States stand to lose their funding, putting at risk the possibility of eliminating the epidemic by 2030.
Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell, a founding father of grunge, dead at 52
Cornell, a key figure in the ’90s grunge rock movement as the founder of Soundgarden and later Audioslave, died Wednesday in Detroit. He was in the middle of a national tour.
Today’s WorldView | Analysis
Iran’s tense presidential election sparks fears of a rigged finale
Friday’s vote favors President Hassan Rouhani, but his bid has been hampered by widespread frustration among ordinary Iranians who have yet to see the dividends of the country’s nuclear deal.
‘Radical centrism’ of France’s new leader looks a lot like conservatism
To the chagrin of leftists, the cabinet choices of French President Emmanuel Macron show he has ceded control of budget and economy to the political right.
Fact Checker | Analysis
Nancy Pelosi’s claim that ‘7 million veterans will lose their tax credit’ under the GOP health bill
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi glossed over the nuances of this issue, so here are the facts.
 
     
 
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