Tuesday’s Headlines: Trump revealed highly classified information to Russian diplomats

Lawmakers express shock, concern about disclosure; The Fix: White House isn’t really denying Trump shared classified information; Analysis: Candidate Trump was worried about revealing U.S. secrets; The Fix: Trump’s rocky history with his intelligence agencies ; Trump will have to navigate diplomatic land mines in his first overseas trip. Here’s how he is preparing.; Cornyn’s GOP colleagues are less than enthusiastic about his candidacy for FBI director; Clues point to possible North Korean involvement in massive cyberattack;
 
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Today's Headlines
The morning’s most important stories, selected by Post editors
 
 
Top Stories
Trump revealed highly classified information to Russian diplomats
The president’s disclosures to the Russian foreign minister and ambassador in their Oval Office meeting last week jeopardized a critical source of intelligence on the Islamic State — an information-sharing arrangement considered so sensitive that details have been withheld from allies and tightly restricted even within the U.S. government, current and former U.S. officials said. Trump appeared to be boasting of the “great intel” he receives when he described a looming terror threat, according to an official with knowledge of the exchange.
Lawmakers express shock, concern about disclosure
“The chaos” in the administration “creates a worrisome environment,” said Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), the chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee.
 
The Fix: White House isn’t really denying Trump shared classified information
National security adviser H.R. McMaster declared the Post story “as reported, is false.” But the rest of his statement wasn’t actually denying the report.
 
Analysis: Candidate Trump was worried about revealing U.S. secrets
Given the report that President Trump revealed classified information to Russian diplomats, it’s worth revisiting what he said about Hillary Clinton’s email security — a subject that came up regularly in his freewheeling stump speeches.
 
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The Fix: Trump’s rocky history with his intelligence agencies
Since getting elected, Trump has had a track record of questioning, worrying, and even directly upsetting, the thousands of men and women who collect and analyze the nation’s top secrets.
 
Trump will have to navigate diplomatic land mines in his first overseas trip. Here’s how he is preparing.
In the days leading up to President Trump’s high-risk debut on the world stage — a nine-day, five-stop, four-nation tour — the Oval Office has morphed into a graduate seminar room to prepare for a trip that could become a resounding triumph or go horribly awry with just one mistake.
 
Cornyn’s GOP colleagues are less than enthusiastic about his candidacy for FBI director
Republican senators signaled concern that if the president were to nominate John Cornyn, it would trigger a raft of consequences that could be detrimental to their agenda.
 
Clues point to possible North Korean involvement in massive cyberattack
Inconclusive research showed that the ransomware that disrupted more than 150 countries shared some code with a tool from a hacker group possibly linked to Pyongyang.
 
 
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