On Leadership: Emmanuel Macron won. Now how will he lead?

Emmanuel Macron, the youngest French leader since Napoleon, won the French election Sunday by a landslide 30-point margin, showcasing a decisive vote against far-right firebrand Marine Le Pen and the rising tide of nationalism. In an effort Sunday to reach out to backers of Le Pen, the victor stressed unity and acknowledged her supporters, saying they had …
 
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French President-elect Emmanuel Macron celebrates at his victory rally near the Louvre in Paris. (Christian Hartmann/Reuters) Emmanuel Macron, the youngest French leader since Napoleon, won the French election Sunday by a landslide 30-point margin, showcasing a decisive vote against far-right firebrand Marine Le Pen and the rising tide of nationalism. In an effort Sunday to reach out to backers of Le Pen, the victor stressed unity and acknowledged her supporters, saying they had “expressed an anger, a dismay, and I respect that. I will do everything possible in the five years to come so that they have no reason to vote for the extremes.” Now, the question comes: How will he lead? Bloomberg has an interesting examination of this question, looking at models of past French presidents to analyze whether he might serve more as a chairman or chief executive, a big-picture leader or a hands-on micro-manager in a country where many voters wonder whether the former investment banker and European Union backer will serve as a “distant elitist”: “In a country where the presidency and its trappings carry some of the aura of the kings and emperors of the past,” write John Fallion and Mark Deen, “how Macron handles that balancing act may determine his success or failure.” The examine the leadership styles of several past French presidents as potential models — or examples to avoid. There was Nicolas Sarkozy, known for a “hyperactive omnipresence” and for meddling in his ministers’ departments. Socialist Francois Mitterand, who led in the 1980s and early 1990s, was aloof and “often acted as if the usual rules didn’t apply to him,” refusing, for instance, to tell the public he had cancer for years. Recent President Francois Hollande aimed to be a “normal” president, but that translated into a nickname after bland but sugary pudding, hardly a compliment. For now, Bloomberg writes, Macron appears poised to lead with a light touch. “Our view is that the president is there to take long-term views and directions,” Benjamin Griveaux, an aide on the campaign team, told the publication. “A president doesn’t have to comment on every scrap of daily news, and he’s not the one who decides how a ministry should cut its budget.” For more on Macron’s win, also check out The Washington Post’s coverage here and here. More on leadership in Washington: 
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*Will President Trump learn on the job? (Harvard Business Review) *The education of Donald Trump (Politico) *Janet Yellen’s long personal speech about women and work (Bloomberg) *There are exactly zero women working on the Republican health care bill (Quartz) *Obama calls on lawmakers to show ‘courage‘ on health care fight (The Washington Post) *Woman featured in Ivanka Trump’s new book reacts: ‘Don’t use my story’ (The Washington Post) More on leadership in business and elsewhere:  *Emmanuel Macron’s unlikely path to the French presidency (The Washington Post) *There are exactly zero women working on the Senate version of the Republican health care bill (Quartz) *From Uber to ‘Feud,’ how ruthlessness rules the day (The New York Times Magazine) *Warren Buffett, at Berkshire meeting, condemns Republican health care bill (The New York Times) *Is the gig economy working? (The New Yorker) *Macron aims for majesty as president (Bloomberg) *The boss doesn’t get fired, and neither do the Feds (Bloomberg View) *’How much do you hate the American people?’ Airline executives get a brutal lashing in Washington (The Washington Post)  
 
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